Types Of African Cichlids – 21 Great Choices (With Pictures)

Would you like a freshwater aquarium that absolutely bursts with color and activity? An African cichlid tank might be the perfect option for you!

With as many as 1600 species on the continent, there’s no shortage of cichlid types to choose from. In this article, we’ll cover 21 amazing species that have made a name for themselves in the aquarium hobby.

So let’s dive right in on the coolest types of African cichlids available for your aquarium!

Key Takeaways

  • African cichlids are some of the most colorful, active, and exotic freshwater fish. They look a lot like tropical reef fish at first glance.
  • Most species come from the hard alkaline waters of Lake Victoria, Tanganyika, and Malawi.
  • Many African cichlids are highly territorial and aggressive, so choose tank mates carefully.
  • Other African cichlids make the best tank mates, but not all species are compatible.
  • Pay close attention to your cichlid’s diet. Many species need a mostly vegetarian diet, and high-protein fish food can cause health problems.

Major Groups

African cichlids are a diverse group of freshwater fish found all over the African continent. They range in size from the diminutive 2-inch shell-dwellers to the emperor cichlid that reaches 3 feet!

Most of the popular African cichlids in the aquarium hobby come from Lake Malawi, although there are many famous species from Lake Tanganyika and Lake Victoria too.

African cichlids are usually grouped into a few main categories. Let’s take a look at the most popular groups:

Mbunas

The mbuna cichlids are some of the most popular African Cichlids in the hobby. These small to medium-sized fish are hardy, colorful, and active. However, mbuna cichlids have a dark side too.

Mbuna Cichlids

These fish are highly territorial and can be very aggressive toward other fish. The males are the most aggressive, and they tend to attack other males of their own species or other similar-looking fish.

Ideally, you should keep them in a species-only setup with one male and a few females, or in a heavily stocked mixed mbuna tank that does not allow enough space for individual territories.

Mbuna’s come from Lake Malawi and are mostly herbivorous. They will eat some meaty fish food, but too much is very bad for their health.

Peacocks

Peacock Cichlids are awesome African cichlids from the Aulonocara genus. The males are some of the most colorful freshwater fish on the planet, although females tend to be drab and mostly brown or gray.

Blue Peacock Cichlid

These fish come from Lake Malawi, just like the Mbunas, but that doesn’t mean the two groups make ideal tank mates.

Peacock cichlids are mostly carnivorous, and they are less aggressive than Mbunas. The differences in diet and the likelihood of fighting make it better to ‘pick a side’ in most cases.

Peacock cichlids are pretty easy to breed, but you should take care to avoid cross-breeding them with similar species. The females look very similar, so keep just one species in your tank to avoid confusion.

Haps

Haps are a diverse group of generally larger carnivorous African cichlids. They are fairly peaceful fish, but many of them of piscivorous which means they will eat any tank mates small enough to swallow.

Hap Cichlid

Haps need a large tank with plenty of swimming space to really thrive. Many species will require over a hundred gallons, but there are options for a 75-gallon tank.

Tropheus

These popular Lake Tanganyika cichlids are similar in behavior to the mbunas of Lake Malawi. There are about 8 species and they prefer to live in rocky areas, especially with plenty of caves and other hiding spots.

Tropheus Cichlid

These African cichlids make fascinating pets in the home aquarium but are highly aggressive and territorial. Tropheus are mostly vegetarian and require a daily supply of spirulina flakes and the occasional supplement of meaty foods like mysis and brine shrimp.

Shell Dwellers

African cichlids tend to be medium to large freshwater fish, and most species need a medium to large fish tank. Fortunately, there is a group of dwarf cichlid species that can live in tanks as small as 10 gallons!

Shell Dwelling Cichlid by Cave

The shell-dwellers are a fascinating group of African cichlids from Lake Tanganyika that live and breed in the empty shells of aquatic snails. These tiny fish vary from just 1.5 to 2.5 inches and can be kept in small colonies in nano aquariums.

Western Species

Most of the popular African cichlids hail from the great African Lakes in the east, although there are a few options from West and Central Africa. Popular West African cichlids include the African butterfly cichlid, the jewel cichlid, and the popular kribensis cichlid.

Top 21 Types of African Cichlids

Are you ready to meet 21 amazing African Cichlid species? Check out the following important facts for each species before choosing your next fish:

  • Scientific Name
  • Size
  • Minimum Tank Size
  • Lake Type
  • Cichlid Type
  • Color Form
  • Water Temperature
  • pH
  • Hardness requirements
  • Diet

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Let’s get started!

1. Yellow Lab

Yellow Lab Cichlid in Aquarium
  • Scientific Name: Labidochromis caeruleus
  • Size: 4 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 40 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Mbuna
  • Color Form: Yellow
  • Water Temperature: 75 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.7 – 8.6
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Mostly vegetarian

The yellow lab cichlid is one of the most popular and recognizable African cichlids in the hobby. These small mbunas from Lake Malawi are bright yellow with a black eye and a black stripe along their dorsal fin.

Yellow lab cichlids can be kept in a colorful mixed mbuna community with other Lake Malawi cichlids or you can give them their own tank and start a breeding project.

2. Malawi Trout

  • Scientific Name: Champsochromis caeruleus
  • Size: 13 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 150 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Large predator hap
  • Color Form: Mostly blue
  • Water Temperature: 75 – 80°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 8.5
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Meaty foods like prawns and mussels, supplemented with dried foods

The Malawi trout (video source) is a lean, mean predatory cichlid species and a real showstopper in a large African cichlid tank. These fish stand out with long, flowing dorsal and anal fins and a strong triangular tail for speed.

This is an active swimming cichlid that needs plenty of space. These fish are not particularly aggressive toward similar-sized species, but they will eat anything small enough to fit in that large mouth.

3. Fossorochomis rostratus

  • Scientific Name: Fossorochomis rostratus
  • Size: 10 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Large hap
  • Color Form: Mostly blue
  • Water Temperature: 77 – 84°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 8.8
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivore, prefers live and frozen foods like brine shrimp and bloodworm

Fossorochomis rostratus (video source) is a large African cichlid with some interesting behaviors. The males are more colorful and have beautiful metallic blue coloration mixed with various shades of purple, green, and yellow. Younger fish have prominent dark blotches along their sides, and mature males develop black bellies.

This peaceful cichlid has the fascinating habit of diving into the sand to look for food or escape predators. They should not be kept with aggressive and territorial species, and a small group of one male and a few females is ideal.

4. Lemon Jack Peacock

  • Scientific Name: Aulonocara jacobfreibergi
  • Size: 6 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Rock-dwelling peacock
  • Color Form: Blue and yellow
  • Water Temperature: 77 – 84°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 9
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous, provide spirulina, fine dried foods, and live/frozen foods.

The Lemon Jake peacock (video source) is a stunning blue and yellow variety of the popular Aulonocara jacobfreibergi cichlid from Lake Malawi. This form occurs naturally around the Undu Reef on the Tanzanian coast.

These fish are often aggressive toward other species with similar colors, and males will fight with each other. Keep a group of one male and a few females to see them on their best behavior.

5. Johanni

Electric Blue Johanni Fish
  • Scientific Name: Melanochromis johanni
  • Size: 4 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 40 gallons
  • Lake Type: Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Mbuna
  • Color Form: Yellow/orange (female) electric blue and black (adult)
  • Water Temperature: 73 – 81°F
  • pH: 7.6 – 8.8
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Spirulina and greens with some live/frozen foods

The Johanni cichlid is a beautiful but aggressive species that does great in busy mbuna cichlid tanks. These fish can be kept in a relatively small tank, although a larger aquarium is recommended for a great mixed mbuna community tank.

The sexes are easy to distinguish by colors, with bright blue males and yellow females. Like most other Mbunas, it’s best to keep one male with a small group of females to prevent aggression.

6. Frontosa

Frontosa Cichlid in Aquarium
  • Scientific Name: Cyphotilapia frontosa
  • Size: 10 – 14 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 125 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Tanganyika
  • Cichlid Type: Large rock-dwelling cichlid
  • Color Form: Black, blue, and white
  • Water Temperature: 73 – 80°F
  • pH: 8 – 9
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 20 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivore. Provide spirulina, greens, frozen foods, and quality pellets

Frontosa cichlids are large and distinctive aquarium fish with bold black bars on a blue/white body. Males develop a large nuchal bump on their foreheads, which is why these fish are also known as humphead cichlids.

Frontosa cichlids inhabit rocky areas in the deep waters of Lake Tanganyika, sometimes over 200 feet below the surface. They are generally peaceful but require a very large aquarium to mimic their natural environment.

7. Buccochromis rhoadesii

  • Scientific Name: Buccochromis rhoadesii
  • Size: 16 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 100 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Large Hap
  • Color Form: Blue and yellow
  • Water Temperature: 74 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 8.4
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 20 dKH
  • Diet: Carnivorous, feed meaty foods

Buccochromis rhoadesii (video source) is a large predatory cichlid that hunts by chasing down smaller fish. These colorful fish are also known as the yellow lepturus cichlid. This is an active species that requires a large aquarium to thrive, although they can be kept with a number of other large haps.

8. Ngara Flametail

  • Scientific Name: Aulonocara stuartgranti
  • Size: 5 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Peacock cichlids
  • Color Form: Blue and orange
  • Water Temperature: 73 – 84 °F
  • pH: 7.5 – 9
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous but requires a meaty diet

The Ngara flametail is one of the most beautiful African cichlids in the hobby. They are a smaller form of the well-known Grant’s Peacock cichlid from Lake Malawi.

Ngara flametails are a good choice for beginners because they are fairly peaceful, hardy, and they can even be kept with some live plants. However, males may attack similar-colored fish, so keep this in mind when selecting tank mates.

9. Malawi Hawk

  • Scientific Name: Aristochromis christyi
  • Size: 10 – 12 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 150 gallons
  • Lake Type: Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Large predatory hap
  • Color Form: Blue and orange
  • Water Temperature: 74 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 9
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Meaty foods like prawns and mussels, supplemented with quality pellets.

The Malawi hawk (video source) is a large and colorful hap species that hunts and eats smaller cichlids in the wild. It gets its name from its beak-like mouth which allows it to swallow fish up to four inches long!

The Malawi Hawk might be dangerous to smaller fish, but they are surprisingly peaceful with large tank mates. They can be kept with other large Lake Malawi species like the Malawi trout and Fossorochomis rostratus.

10. Maulana Bicolor Peacock

  • Scientific Name: Aulonocara stuartgranti
  • Size: 6 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Peacock cichlid
  • Color Form: Blue and yellow
  • Water Temperature: 74 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 8.4
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous but requires a meaty diet

The Maulana bicolor peacock cichlid is another great variety of Grant’s peacock, a widespread cichlid in Lake Malawi. This form comes from the Chitimba Bay area on the northwest coast.

Male Maulana bicolor peacocks are electric blue with a characteristic yellow/orange stripe just behind the head. The smaller females have dull brown colors and are difficult to distinguish from other female peacocks.

11. OB Peacock

  • Scientific Name: Hybrid
  • Size: 6 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons
  • Lake Type: Captive bred
  • Cichlid Type: Peacock
  • Color Form: ‘Orange blotch’
  • Water Temperature: 74 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 8.4
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous but requires a meaty diet

OB peacock cichlids (video source) are gorgeous hybrid fish developed by crossing different species. The original species combination is unknown, but many aquarists believe it involved a male peacock and a female mbuna.

OB stands for orange blotch, which is a pretty good description of their colors! However, these fish are available in many other color patterns, including shades of blue, pink, and yellow. You won’t find them in nature, and each specimen is truly unique when it comes to its colors and patterns.

12. Eureka Red Peacock

Eureka Red Cichlid
  • Scientific Name: Aulonocara jacobfreibergi
  • Size: 6 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Rock-dwelling peacock
  • Color Form: Blue and Orange
  • Water Temperature: 77 – 84°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 9
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous, provide spirulina, fine dried foods, and live/frozen foods.

The Eureka red cichlid is another great variety of the popular Aulonocara jacobfreibergi peacock from Lake Malawi. The males are predominantly orange with varying amounts of dark blue, creating a very eye-catching centerpiece fish.

13. Sulphurhead Peacock

  • Scientific Name: Aulonocara maylandi
  • Size: 4 – 6 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 40 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Peacock
  • Color Form: Black, blue, and yellow
  • Water Temperature: 74 – 82 °F
  • pH: 7.5 – 9
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 20 dKH
  • Diet: Flakes, pellets, and frozen foods

The sulphurhead peacock cichlid is a striking species with a yellow blaze that runs from its nose to the start of the dorsal fin. This bright yellow streak continues along the top of the dorsal fin, and they often have a yellow lower edge of the anal fin too.

These beautiful African cichlids are very peaceful so they are not suited to cichlid communities with more boisterous species. However, they really shine in species-only cichlid aquariums.

14. Lwanda Peacock

  • Scientific Name: Aulonocara sp. ‘Lwanda’
  • Size: 6 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 75 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Peacock
  • Color Form: Blue and orange
  • Water Temperature: 78 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 8.5
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Carnivorous, feed them quality flakes or pellets and live/frozen foods

The Lwanda peacock cichlid is a deep-bodied species with shapely fins. Males have an interesting mix of colors, combining blue and orange on the body and fins.

These territorial fish should be kept in a small group consisting of one male and a few females. They are fairly easy to breed but may hybridize with other Aulonocara species.

15. Dragon Blood Peacock

  • Scientific Name: Aulonocara sp. hybrid
  • Size: 6 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 55 gallons
  • Lake Type: Captive bred
  • Cichlid Type: Peacock
  • Color Form: Red/pink
  • Water Temperature: 78 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.8 – 8.6
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Carnivorous, provide quality flakes or pellets and live/frozen foods

The dragon blood peacock is another Aulonocara hybrid with unique colors and markings. These fish are also known as fire cichlids, and they are usually available in shades from pink to bright red. The head and fins are often a lighter color varying from white to light blue.

They are fairly aggressive peacocks but can be kept in a well-planned African cichlid community. Like other peacocks, the dragon blood will sift through the sand in search of food.

16. Cobalt Blue Zebra

Cobalt Zebra Cichlid
  • Scientific Name: Maylandia callainos
  • Size: 5 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 40 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Rock-dwelling mbuna
  • Color Form: Blue and black
  • Water Temperature: 75 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.6 – 8.8
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous. Feed spirulina flakes and greens supplemented with live/frozen foods

Cobalt blue zebra cichlids have a striking blue color, often with a series of vertical black bars on their sides. They are good mbunas for beginner cichlid keepers, although they are aggressively territorial like most other fish in their family.

Fortunately, aggressive behavior can be limited by choosing the right tank mates and keeping just one male in the same tank. They will do best in a heavily stocked mbuna tank, and a group of one male and a few females is recommended.

17. Red Zebra

Red Zebra Cichlid
  • Scientific Name: Pseudotropheus estherae
  • Size: 5 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 40 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Mbuna
  • Color Form: Orange
  • Water Temperature: 75 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.8 – 8.8
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous. Provide greens, spirulina flakes, and live/frozen foods.

The red zebra cichlid is another great mbuna from Lake Malawi. These fish are one of the most popular African cichlids because both males and females have a great orange color. Like other Mbunas, these fish are naturally territorial and aggressive.

18. Saulosi

The Saulosi cichlid (video source) is known as a dwarf mbuna because they usually grow to just 3.5 inches or so. These fish really draw attention, and males and females add variety with completely different colors! Males are electric blue with dark vertical stripes and females are plain yellow/orange.

They are true Mbunas, although they are less aggressive than other species from this group. Keep these fish in a rocky aquascape that mimics their natural habitat.

19. Calvus

Calvus Fish
  • Scientific Name: Altolamprologus calvus
  • Size: 3-6 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Tanganyika
  • Cichlid Type: Predatory rock-dweller
  • Color Form: Black and white
  • Water Temperature: 75 – 80°F
  • pH: 7.5 – 9
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 20 dKH
  • Diet: Carnivorous. Provide meaty frozen foods

The calvus cichlid is a unique predatory fish with a strange body shape and dramatic markings. They may not have any bright colors, but their spectacular spots and stripes make them stand out in any aquarium!

Calvus are predators, with big mouths for swallowing live prey like insects and small fish. They are not aggressive towards similar-sized fish and should not be kept with other boisterous fish like mbunas or tropheus.

20. Demasoni

Demasoni Fish
  • Scientific Name: Pseudotropheus demasoni
  • Size: 3 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 40 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Malawi
  • Cichlid Type: Mbuna
  • Color Form: Blue and black
  • Water Temperature: 75 – 82°F
  • pH: 7.8 – 8.8
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 15 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous. Feed mostly spirulina flake and greens but supplement with live/frozen foods.

Demasoni cichlids are small but highly aggressive Lake Malawi Cichlids that are not afraid to tackle larger species. They can be kept with other mbunas but it’s best to avoid similar-looking tank mates.

Both males and females are great-looking fish, and they can be tricky to sex. However, males grow larger than females and are more aggressively territorial.

21. Duboisi

Tropheus Cichlid
  • Scientific Name: Tropheus duboisi
  • Size: 4.8 inches
  • Minimum Tank Size: 29 gallons
  • Lake Type: Lake Tanganyika
  • Cichlid Type: Rock dwellers
  • Color Form: Black and white
  • Water Temperature: 73 – 81°F
  • pH: 8 – 9.5
  • Hardness requirements: 10 – 20 dKH
  • Diet: Omnivorous. Feed mostly spirulina flake and greens but supplement with live/frozen foods.

The duboisi cichlid is also known as the white spotted cichlid because it has white spots on a black body when young. Mature fish fade to a blue-black shade and develop a single white bar on either side of their body.

These fish are highly aggressive toward their own species but relatively peaceful with other fish. They can be kept as a single specimen or in a large school (15+) in a limited space.

Tank Setup and Care Tips

African cichlids are hardy and easy to keep if you choose their tank mates correctly and provide them with a healthy natural environment. Let’s run through a few important African cichlid care tips.

Tank Size

Most African cichlids need a medium to large aquarium, although some of the dwarf cichlid species like Neolamprologus can be housed in a 10 to 20-gallon tank.

30 gallons is the minimum for some of the dwarf Mbunas and peacocks, but a 55-gallon tank is the recommended starting point for an African cichlid community.

Diet

African cichlids are a diverse group of fish, so a one-size-fits-all approach is not recommended. These fish can be very sensitive to poor nutrition, and easily develop problems like obesity and even dangerous health conditions like Malawi bloat.

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Most African cichlids can be fed prepared foods like cichlid pellets and spirulina flakes, although a more balanced diet is necessary for long-term health. The mbunas in particular require a low-protein diet consisting of algae and vegetable matter, with the occasional meaty supplement.

Choosing Tank Mates

Choosing tank mates for African cichlids can be a daunting task. Often the best results come from intentionally overstocking their tank so there is no room for them to claim any territories.

Make sure to research compatibility carefully before adding new fish to your tank, and remember that sex ratios can be just as important as a species selection.

It’s also possible to attempt an all male cichlid tank. For further details on how to attempt this I suggest checking out the this cichlid forum.

Maintenance

African Cichlids are pretty messy fish, and a heavily stocked community tank is going to need high filtration and regular maintenance. Over-filtering is the norm with these tanks, and weekly water changes are recommended to manage nitrate levels.

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FAQs

What Is The Most Common African Cichlid Species?

Mbuna cichlids are the most popular African cichlid species in the hobby. Red zebra cichlids and yellow labs are some of the most common species in the aquarium trade for their amazing colors and high activity levels.

What Are The 2 Main Groups Of Cichlids?

The two main groups of cichlids are the African cichlids and the New World cichlids. Most of the African cichlids come from the great lakes of East Africa, whereas the New World cichlids come from North, Central, and South America.

How Many Types Of Malawi Species Are There?

There are a staggering 850 species of Cichlids in Lake Malawi. Of course, not all of these fish are available or even suitable for aquariums, but there is still a multitude of Malawi cichlids available in the aquarium trade.

What Is The Rarest Species?

There are a staggering 850 species of Cichlids in Lake Malawi. Of course, not all of these fish are available or even suitable for aquariums, but there is still a multitude of Malawi cichlids available in the aquarium trade.

What Is The Rarest Species?

At least 52 cichlid species are classified as endangered and a further 106 as critically endangered. Many species are threatened by overfishing, pollution, and the introduction of non-native fish. The Lake Victoria Cichlids, for example, are under serious threat after the Nile Perch was introduced in the 1950s.

What Are Some Of The Most Peaceful Species?

African Cichlids have a reputation for being aggressive fish, so they are hardly ever a safe option for a peaceful community tank. However, there are some species that stand out as more peaceful than the rest.

Frontosa Cichlids may have an intimidating look, but they are actually gentle giants in an African cichlid aquarium. The kribensis cichlids are one of the few African species that can be kept in a small community tank with other popular freshwater fish species, although they can be aggressive when breeding.

Final Thoughts

African cichlids are real eye candy for fish lovers. Their bright colors, interesting behaviors, and high activity levels make an African cichlid tank one of the most captivating to keep. Hopefully, you have enjoyed this article and learned more about some of Africa’s most exciting freshwater fish!

Do you keep African cichlids? Tell us about your favorite species in the comments below!

2 COMMENTS

  1. I have a 125 gallon tank with African Cichlids. 2 Yellow Lab, 2 Demasonii, 1 Bumblebee, 1 Nkhata Orange (what was listed at the pet store), 2 Electric Blue (I believe they are Johanni, but I discovered a baby that managed to survive and looks just like mom and they are not yellow), a Parrotfish and a Pleco. I love watching all of them, but I think I enjoy watching the Nkhata the most, he seems to have a funny personality, he’s the first to eat and will get a whole mouthful of tubifex worms.

    Reply

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